Macklin & Aunt Emma

Kelly McDonald spoke to us yesterday about her research project and the mystery of Emma Austen’s Aunt Emma [Emma Austen married Jane Austen’s nephew James Edward Austen-Leigh]. It was a great presentation taking us into the various avenues of her research into Emma’s family, and with terrific participation from all in the audience, we are now hooked on this not-yet-solved mystery and will await updates – there is a novel in here somewhere I know! Here are Kelly’s thoughts on it all… reblogged from her blog Two Teens in the Time of Austen, with thanks.

Two Teens in the Time of Austen

I want to thank JASNA-Vermont for inviting me to speak at their June gathering yesterday – and for dipping with me in the waters of RESEARCH into the family of the Austens. So little time, so MUCH information! My illustrated talk entitled “The Mystery of Emma Austen’s Aunt Emma” was an “interactive” presentation – and people really spoke up, made observations, added comments, asked questions. It was GREAT! Later, one audience member even told me my “research reads like a thrilling mystery!” Heartening words, indeed. No one can ever guess the “desert” a writer *feels* to be stranded in, when the research is this intensive and taking years to produce something substantive.

pen and letters

I figure I’m closing in on a THOUSAND letters and several HUNDRED diaries – and more turns up. I just returned (after midnight, last friday…) from a research jaunt to New York City.

Very helpful staff at NYU…

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Another look at the 2013 JASNA AGM, Minneapolis

So great to share this AGM in Minneapolis with you and Michelle!

twogirlsfishing

Michelle has done so much justice to our JASNA AGM experience in Minneapolis, it’s not even funny. It was an amazing four days away from it all—so much so that we didn’t even usually bother to stop and recall that we were, indeed, away from it all. We were just there, immersed in all things Austen, all things Pride and Prejudice, and it was great.

Like Michelle, I came away with two things at the forefront of my mind: 1) I am only a fan and avid reader and lover of Jane Austen; I do not approach the level of serious, scholarly, and academic thought that goes into a real and deep study of her novels, although I desperately admire it and have just enough knowledge to be excited by it; and 2) Jane Austen is even more awesome than I realized. I suppose we’ve become…

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The Jane Austen Society of North America (JASNA) Annual General Meeting (AGM) in Minneapolis, Minnesota (MN)

So great to share this AGM with you and Sarah!

twogirlsfishing

It’s been five days since our reentry into the 21st century and everyday lives. For three days, Friday, September 27 – Sunday, September 29, Sarah and I joined 750 other readers to talk about one author, and just one of her books: Jane Austen’s “own darling child” Pride & Prejudice. To sit in a full convention hall to celebrate one woman and her book, 200 years old this year, was a marvel. And yet, after listening to plenary speaker, John Mullan, on “Speechless in Pride & Prejudice,” almost 800 people didn’t seem at all out of bounds for such a subject. I came away loving Jane even more, something I didn’t think was possible.

At home, I’m the trivia nut, and have even been accused of being “obsessed” with Jane Austen. Folks, I was nothing compared to this crowd. Mullan opened up his talk with a trivia question…

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Will the real model for Pemberley please step forward?

Janine’s talk at the AGM was very enlightening! – hopefully it will be published in ‘Persuasions’; but you can also read the whole wonderful book [‘Matters of Fact in Jane Austen’], where the various sites and names in all of Austen’s works are discussed…

Johns Hopkins University Press Blog

Guest post by Janine Barchas

Today marks the start of the annual gathering of the Jane Austen Society of North America (JASNA), hosted this year in Minneapolis. This particular meeting celebrates the bicentennial of Pride and Prejudice (first published in 1813) with the pomp that is due this standout literary favorite, including workshops, exhibits, lectures, readings, and, of course, a Regency-style ball. Because I recently published a book about Jane Austen as a consummate name-dropper and participant in early celebrity culture, I was invited to speak to JASNA members about the celebrity currency of the names in Pride and Prejudice .

This post is a sneak peek into the new research that I will be sharing with JASNA members about how specific surnames and locations in Pride and Prejudice slyly point to the ancestral home of the real-world Fitzwilliam and Darcy families—directing a reader’s encounter with the fictional estate of…

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Now on Kindle = Two Teens in the Time of Austen: Random Jottings, 2008-2013

Kelly was the driving force behind the formation of the JASNA Vermont Region – if you have been following her blog at Two Teens in the Time of Austen – or you are just discovering it for the first time today, head over to Amazon and add this to your kindle! – I promise you will not be disappointed!

Two Teens in the Time of Austen

cover-twoteens

Smith&GoslingThe biography A Memoir of Jane Austen, compiled by her nephew James Edward Austen Leigh, was first published in 1870 (2nd edition on google.books). In 1911, daughter Mary Augusta Austen Leigh wrote down Edward’s own life history. Two Teens in the Time of Austen dramatizes events in the lives of Edward’s beloved wife Emma Smith (1801-1876) and her friend and sister-in-law Mary Gosling (1800-1842).

It is Emma’s eventual connection to the Austens of Steventon which gives this project its very name!  (The fact that the diaries of both girls begin in the period that saw Austen’s publications, doesn’t hurt either.)  Celebrate with me five years of uncovering the lives of the Smiths & Goslings. You can even “click to Look Inside“. Lightly edited, and highly rearranged, “Random Jottings” (estimated at 170 pages) serves as an introduction to the world of my Two Teens from posts published…

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Austen Sighting ~ Lee Child on Jane Austen

An interview with Lee Child in The New York Yimes Book Review:

What do you plan to read next?

My to-be-read pile is enormous, but winking ominously at me is Jane Austen’s “Emma.” I have never read Jane Austen — in my American wife’s eyes an incredible deficiency for an Englishman, matched only by the fact that I don’t really like Mozart. I hadn’t read “Jane Eyre” either, until she made me, and I’m glad I did, so I’ll get to “Emma” eventually — but perhaps not soon.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/23/books/review/lee-child-by-the-book.html?pagewanted=2&_r=0&ref=todayspaper

Thanks to Julie at Austenonly for the information on this London auction! – for an update on these titles and other Austens at auction over the past month see here:  https://janeausteninvermont.wordpress.com/2012/11/15/austen-on-the-block-an-austen-filled-autumn-at-upcoming-auctions/

Austenonly

These books went on sale at auction today at Sotheby’s in London. The pre-sale estimate for Lot 86  was between £150,000-200,000. Bidding stopped at £142,000. It was ,therefore, unsold.

I have written about the intriguing history of this set of books before, here. This first edition set  was sent to Jane Austen’s friend, Anne Sharp, directly from her publisher, John Murray, specifically  at Jane Austen’s request.

The next lot, Lot 87, a first edition set of Northanger Abbey and Persuasion once owned by Fulwar Craven Fowle, was also unsold.The biding on this item stopped at £3800.

Fascinating.

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