Mr. Darcy’s Feelings; Or, More on the Inner Life of Jane Austen’s Hero…Part III

Well, the Holidays certainly got in the way of Mr. Darcy’s feelings, and though we are now past celebrating the 200th of Pride and Prejudice and on to Mansfield Park, I must finally do the remaining posts on said feelings as found in volume 3 – a volume chock-full of strong feelings on both sides! – Elizabeth regresses into a Teenage-mindset on several occasions – and as for Darcy, we see his awkward behavior and efforts only through Elizabeth’s eyes – we can only hope [along with the perceptive Gardiners and the Narrator]  that since he seems to want to be around Elizabeth as much as possible that he must not be holding any grudges about his rejected first proposal – or are we, like Elizabeth and the Gardiners, reading too much into it all… ?

We left off with Elizabeth and her Aunt and Uncle Gardiner off to Pemberley and we are rapidly approaching the infamous “wet-shirt” scene of the 1995 BBC adaptation – no such shirt found on the page I am sorry to say, but you will see that Jane Austen says much to give vent to the very strong feelings of Elizabeth and Darcy as they meet on his “beautiful grounds”….


Chatsworth [a.k.a. Pemberley]
from Morris’s Seats of Noblemen and Gentlemen (1880) (Wikipedia)

…so read along with me  [I underline here the stronger passages; any italics are Austen’s own] – –  this is terribly long- but so much is expressed, I couldn’t leave much out! – I suggest you just re-read the whole chapter!

Chapter 1 (p. 185 ff).  Elizabeth’s feelings as she silently surveys the house and grounds:

Elizabeth, as they drove along, watched for the first appearance of Pemberley Woods with some perturbation; and when at length they turned in at the lodge, her spirits were in a high flutter.

… Elizabeth was delighted. She had never seen a place for which nature had done more, or where natural beauty had been so little counteracted by an awkward taste. They were all of them warm in their admiration; and at that moment she felt that to be mistress of Pemberley might be something!

… all her apprehensions of meeting its owner returned. She dreaded lest the chambermaid had been mistaken. On applying to see the place, they were admitted into the hall; and Elizabeth, as they waited for the housekeeper, had leisure to wonder at her being where she was.

…and she looked on the whole scene — the river, the trees scattered on its banks, and the winding of the valley, as far as she could trace it — with delight. As they passed into other rooms these objects were taking different positions; but from every window there were beauties to be seen. The rooms were lofty and handsome, and their furniture suitable to the fortune of their proprietor; but Elizabeth saw, with admiration of his taste, that it was neither gaudy nor uselessly fine; with less of splendor, and more real elegance, than the furniture of Rosings.

And of this place,” thought she, “I might have been mistress! With these rooms I might now have been familiarly acquainted! Instead of viewing them as a stranger, I might have rejoiced in them as my own, and welcomed to them as visitors my uncle and aunt. But no” — recollecting herself — “that could never be: my uncle and aunt would have been lost to me; I should not have been allowed to invite them.” 

   This was a lucky recollection — it saved her from something like regret.

p. 187-88. and she listens to the Mrs. Reynolds in rapt attention:


CE Brock – P&P (Nelson & Sons, n.d.) (Mollands)

Mrs. Reynolds’s respect for Elizabeth seemed to increase on this intimation of her knowing her master. 

   “Does that young lady know Mr. Darcy?” 

   Elizabeth coloured, and said — “A little.” 

“I say no more than the truth, and what everybody will say that knows him,” replied the other [Mrs. Reynolds]. Elizabeth thought this was going pretty far; and she listened with increasing astonishment as the housekeeper added, “I have never had a cross word from him in my life, and I have known him ever since he was four years old.” 

   This was praise, of all others most extraordinary, most opposite to her ideas. That he was not a good-tempered man had been her firmest opinion. Her keenest attention was awakened; she longed to hear more… Elizabeth almost stared at her. “Can this be Mr. Darcy!” thought she. … Elizabeth listened, wondered, doubted, and was impatient for more

p. 189.  One of my favorite scenes:

Dent 1898-HMBrock-eatdpicture-adelaide

“In earnest contemplation” – H. M. Brock. P&P. Dent, 1898.  Adelaide ebook

Elizabeth walked on in quest of the only face whose features would be known to her. At last it arrested her — and she beheld a striking resemblance of Mr. Darcy, with such a smile over the face as she remembered to have sometimes seen when he looked at her. She stood several minutes before the picture in earnest contemplation, and returned to it again before they quitted the gallery… 

There was certainly at this moment, in Elizabeth’s mind, a more gentle sensation towards the original than she had ever felt in the height of their acquaintance. The commendation bestowed on him by Mrs. Reynolds was of no trifling nature. What praise is more valuable than the praise of an intelligent servant? As a brother, a landlord, a master, she considered how many people’s happiness were in his guardianship! — how much of pleasure or pain it was in his power to bestow! — how much of good or evil must be done by him! Every idea that had been brought forward by the housekeeper was favourable to his character, and as she stood before the canvas, on which he was represented, and fixed his eyes upon herself, she thought of his regard with a deeper sentiment of gratitude than it had ever raised before; she remembered its warmth, and softened its impropriety of expression.

p. 190.  I love the way Austen slyly refers to Darcy as “the owner of it himself” – surprising the reader as much as Elizabeth…


 As they walked across the lawn towards the river, Elizabeth turned back to look again; her uncle and aunt stopped also: and while the former was conjecturing as to the date of the building, the owner of it himself suddenly came forward from the road which led behind it to the stables. 

   They were within twenty yards of each other, and so abrupt was his appearance that it was impossible to avoid his sight. Their eyes instantly met, and the cheeks of each were overspread with the deepest blush. He absolutely started, and for a moment seemed immoveable from surprise; but shortly recovering himself, advanced towards the party, and spoke to Elizabeth, if not in terms of perfect composure, at least of perfect civility. 

She had instinctively turned away; but, stopping on his approach, received his compliments with an embarrassment impossible to be overcome. Had his first appearance, or his resemblance to the picture they had just been examining, been insufficient to assure the other two that they now saw Mr. Darcy, the gardener’s expression of surprise, on beholding his master, must immediately have told it. They stood a little aloof while he was talking to their niece, who, astonished and confused, scarcely dared lift her eyes to his face, and knew not what answer she returned to his civil enquiries after her family. Amazed at the alteration in his manner since they last parted, every sentence that he uttered was increasing her embarrassment; and every idea of the impropriety of her being found there recurring to her mind, the few minutes in which they continued together were some of the most uncomfortable of her life. Nor did he seem much more at ease: when he spoke, his accent had none of its usual sedateness; and he repeated his enquiries as to the time of her having left Longbourn, and of her stay in Derbyshire, so often, and in so hurried a way, as plainly spoke the distraction of his thoughts.  

   At length every idea seemed to fail him; and, after standing a few moments without saying a word, he suddenly recollected himself, and took leave.

p. 189-90.  Two people completely out of it…

… but Elizabeth heard not a word, and, wholly engrossed by her own feelings, followed them in silence. She was overpowered by shame and vexation. Her coming there was the most unfortunate, the most ill-judged thing in the world! How strange must it appear to him! In what a disgraceful light might it not strike so vain a man! It might seem as if she had purposely thrown herself in his way again! Oh! why did she come? or, why did he thus come a day before he was expected? Had they been only ten minutes sooner, they should have been beyond the reach of his discrimination; for it was plain that he was that moment arrived — that moment alighted from his horse or his carriage. She blushed again and again over the perverseness of the meeting. And his behaviour, so strikingly altered — what could it mean? That he should even speak to her was amazing! — but to speak with such civility, to inquire after her family! Never in her life had she seen his manners so little dignified, never had he spoken with such gentleness as on this unexpected meeting. What a contrast did it offer to his last address in Rosings Park, when he put his letter into her hand! She knew not what to think, nor how to account for it. 

…  but it was some time before Elizabeth was sensible of any of it; and, though she answered mechanically to the repeated appeals of her uncle and aunt, and seemed to direct her eyes to such objects as they pointed out, she distinguished no part of the scene. Her thoughts were all fixed on that one spot of Pemberley House, whichever it might be, where Mr. Darcy then was. She longed to know what at that moment was passing in his mind — in what manner he thought of her, and whether, in defiance of everything, she was still dear to him. Perhaps he had been civil only because he felt himself at ease; yet there had been that in his voice which was not like ease. Whether he had felt more of pain or of pleasure in seeing her she could not tell, but he certainly had not seen her with composure

   At length, however, the remarks of her companions on her absence of mind roused her, and she felt the necessity of appearing more like herself.

p. 192-96. The return of the surprisingly civil Mr. Darcy:

Whilst wandering on in this slow manner, they were again surprised, and Elizabeth’s astonishment was quite equal to what it had been at first, by the sight of Mr. Darcy approaching them, and at no great distance … he was immediately before them… and, to imitate his politeness, she began as they met to admire the beauty of the place; but she had not got beyond the words “delightful,” and “charming,” when some unlucky recollections obtruded, and she fancied that praise of Pemberley from her, might be mischievously construed. Her colour changed, and she said no more.


Darcy asking to be introduced to the Gardiners – P&P Sims on photobucket

Mrs. Gardiner was standing a little behind; and on her pausing, he asked her if she would do him the honour of introducing him to her friends. This was a stroke of civility for which she was quite unprepared; and she could hardly suppress a smile at his being now seeking the acquaintance of some of those very people against whom his pride had revolted in his offer to herself. “What will be his surprise,” thought she, “when he knows who they are? He takes them now for people of fashion.”

   The introduction, however, was immediately made; and as she named their relationship to herself, she stole a sly look at him, to see how he bore it, and was not without the expectation of his decamping as fast as he could from such disgraceful companions. That he was surprised by the connexion was evident; he sustained it, however, with fortitude, and, so far from going away, turned back with them, and entered into conversation with Mr. Gardiner. Elizabeth could not but be pleased, could not but triumph. It was consoling that he should know she had some relations for whom there was no need to blush. She listened most attentively to all that passed between them, and gloried in every expression, every sentence of her uncle, which marked his intelligence, his taste, or his good manners. …

… it gratified her exceedingly; the compliment must be all for herself. Her astonishment, however, was extreme, and continually was she repeating, “Why is he so altered? From what can it proceed? It cannot be for me — it cannot be for my sake that his manners are thus softened. My reproofs at Hunsford could not work such a change as this. It is impossible that he should still love me.”

…Elizabeth answered only by a slight bow. Her thoughts were instantly driven back to the time when Mr. Bingley’s name had been last mentioned between them; and, if she might judge from his complexion, his mind was not very differently engaged.

…  it was gratifying to know that his resentment had not made him think really ill of her… she was flattered and pleased… At such a time much might have been said, and silence was very awkward. She wanted to talk, but there seemed an embargo on every subject. At last she recollected that she had been travelling, and they talked of Matlock and Dovedale with great perseverance. Yet time and her aunt moved slowly [ha! – I love these two lines!]

…  The occurrences of the day were too full of interest to leave Elizabeth much attention for any of these new friends; and she could do nothing but think, and think with wonder, of Mr. Darcy’s civility, and above all, of his wishing her to be acquainted with his sister.

Chapter 2.

p. 197. Here Austen lets us see Darcy and Elizabeth from someone else’s point of view – The Gardiners are taking notice of each of them and find that…

 many of the circumstances of the preceding day, opened to them a new idea on the business. Nothing had ever suggested it before, but they now felt that there was no other way of accounting for such attentions from such a quarter than by supposing a partiality for their niece. While these newly born notions were passing in their heads, the perturbation of Elizabeth’s feelings was every moment increasing. She was quite amazed at her own discomposure; … The suspicions which had just arisen of Mr. Darcy and their niece directed their observation towards each with an earnest though guarded inquiry; and they soon drew from those inquiries the full conviction that one of them at least knew what it was to love. Of the lady’s sensations they remained a little in doubt; but that the gentleman was overflowing with admiration was evident enough.

And later [p. 200] … it was evident that he was very much in love with her.

p. 199. Elizabeth is all astonishment!

… she [Elizabeth] saw an expression of general complaisance, and in all that he said she heard an accent so far removed from hauteur or disdain of his companions, as convinced her that the improvement of manners which she had yesterday witnessed, however temporary its existence might prove, had at least outlived one day. … the difference, the change was so great, and struck so forcibly on her mind, that she could hardly restrain her astonishment from being visible.

p. 201. Wherein Elizabeth tries to figure out her feelings with the Help of the Narrator:

As for Elizabeth, her thoughts were at Pemberley this evening more than the last; and the evening, though as it passed it seemed long, was not long enough to determine her feelings towards one in that mansion; and she lay awake two whole hours endeavouring to make them out. She certainly did not hate him. No; hatred had vanished long ago, and she had almost as long been ashamed of ever feeling a dislike against him, that could be so called. The respect created by the conviction of his valuable qualities, though at first unwillingly admitted, had for some time ceased to be repugnant to her feelings; and it was now heightened into somewhat of a friendlier nature by the testimony so highly in his favour, and bringing forward his disposition in so amiable a light, which yesterday had produced. But above all, above respect and esteem, there was a motive within her of goodwill which could not be overlooked. It was gratitude — gratitude, not merely for having once loved her, but for loving her still well enough to forgive all the petulance and acrimony of her manner in rejecting him, and all the unjust accusations accompanying her rejection. He who, she had been persuaded, would avoid her as his greatest enemy, seemed, on this accidental meeting, most eager to preserve the acquaintance, and without any indelicate display of regard, or any peculiarity of manner, where their two selves only were concerned, was soliciting the good opinion of her friends, and bent on making her known to his sister. Such a change in a man of so much pride, excited not only astonishment but gratitudefor to love, ardent love, it must be attributed; and as such, its impression on her was of a sort to be encouraged, as by no means unpleasing, though it could not be exactly defined. She respected, she esteemed, she was grateful to him, she felt a real interest in his welfare; and she only wanted to know how far she wished that welfare to depend upon herself, and how far it would be for the happiness of both that she should employ the power, which her fancy told her she still possessed, of bringing on the renewal of his addresses.

Chapter 3: p. 203. Elizabeth in Teenage-mode:


 Darcy and Georgiana – P&P 1995 (Jane Austen wikia)

She expected every moment that some of the gentlemen would enter the room. She wished, she feared that the master of the house might be amongst them; and whether she wished or feared it most, she could scarcely determine…

… Elizabeth had a fair opportunity of deciding whether she most feared or wished for the appearance of Mr. Darcy, by the feelings which prevailed on his entering the room; and then, though but a moment before she had believed her wishes to predominate, she began to regret that he came.

p. 204.  Miss Bingley on the attack…brings up the militia in Meryton…and Elizabeth tries to ‘quiet everyone’s emotions’:

…an involuntary glance shewed her Darcy, with an heightened complexion, earnestly looking at her, and his sister overcome with confusion, and unable to lift up her eyes.


 The Look – P&P 1995
[in my opinion, far better than the wet-shirt scene, and wherein Andrew Davies gets it completely right…]

p. 205. And Miss Bingley keeps at him, questioning Elizabeth’s beauty, her eyes, her fashion, etc… but Darcy does not take the bait:

  “Yes,” replied Darcy, who could contain himself no longer, “but that was only when I first knew her; for it is many months since I have considered her as one of the handsomest women of my acquaintance.”

p. 206. Communication failures between Elizabeth and Mrs. Gardiner:

They talked of his sister, his friends, his house, his fruit (!)— of everything but himself; yet Elizabeth was longing to know what Mrs. Gardiner thought of him, and Mrs. Gardiner would have been highly gratified by her niece’s beginning the subject.

Chapter 4. p. 209-10.  The Lydia mess:

… her pale face and impetuous manner made him start, and before he could recover himself enough to speak, she, in whose mind every idea was superseded by Lydia’s situation, hastily exclaimed, “I beg your pardon, but I must leave you. I must find Mr. Gardiner this moment…

   “Good God! what is the matter?” cried he, with more feeling than politeness…

…it was impossible for Darcy to leave her, or to refrain from saying, in a tone of gentleness and commiseration, “Let me call your maid. Is there nothing you could take to give you present relief? A glass of wine; — shall I get you one? You are very ill.”

… She burst into tears as she alluded to it, and for a few minutes could not speak another word. Darcy, in wretched suspense, could only say something indistinctly of his concern, and observe her in compassionate silence.

Darcy was fixed in astonishment….

…Darcy made no answer. He seemed scarcely to hear her, and was walking up and down the room in earnest meditation, his brow contracted, his air gloomy. Elizabeth soon observed, and instantly understood it. Her power was sinking; everything must sink under such a proof of family weakness, such an assurance of the deepest disgrace. She could neither wonder nor condemn, but the belief of his self-conquest brought nothing consolatory to her bosom, afforded no palliation of her distress. It was, on the contrary, exactly calculated to make her understand her own wishes; and never had she so honestly felt that she could have loved him, as now, when all love must be vain…

p. 211. And here is Elizabeth expressing full knowledge of how she feels about Darcy, with another little tweak from the Narrator:

 …[Darcy] with only one serious, parting look, went away…. As he quitted the room, Elizabeth felt how improbable it was that they should ever see each other again on such terms of cordiality as had marked their several meetings in Derbyshire; and as she threw a retrospective glance over the whole of their acquaintance, so full of contradictions and varieties, sighed at the perverseness of those feelings which would now have promoted its continuance, and would formerly have rejoiced in its termination.

 [Austen on love-at-first-sight] If gratitude and esteem are good foundations of affection, Elizabeth’s change of sentiment will be neither improbable nor faulty. But if otherwise — if the regard springing from such sources is unreasonable or unnatural, in comparison of what is so often described as arising on a first interview with its object, and even before two words have been exchanged — nothing can be said in her defence, except that she had given somewhat of a trial to the latter method in her partiality for Wickham, and that its ill success might, perhaps, authorise her to seek the other less interesting mode of attachment. Be that as it may, she saw him go with regret

p. 212. The ever-astute Mrs. Gardiner questions it all:

mrsgardiner-joanna david-JAT

   Mrs. Gardiner – P&P 1995 (Joanna David)
(Jane Austen Today)

[Elizabeth] “Yes; and I told him we should not be able to keep our engagement. That is all settled.”

  “That is all settled” repeated the other, as she ran into her room to prepare. “And are they upon such terms as for her to disclose the real truth? Oh, that I knew how it was!” 

And later [p. 226]:  Mrs. Gardiner … went away in all the perplexity about Elizabeth and her Derbyshire friend that had attended her from that part of the world. His name had never been voluntarily mentioned before then by her niece; and the kind of half-expectation which Mrs. Gardiner had formed, of their being followed by a letter from him, had ended in nothing. Elizabeth had received none since her return, that could come from Pemberley….

p. 227. More of Elizabeth’s inner thoughts:

…though Elizabeth, who was by this time tolerably well acquainted with her own feelings, was perfectly aware that, had she known nothing of Darcy, she could have borne the dread of Lydia’s infamy somewhat better. It would have spared her, she thought, one sleepless night out of two. [!]

p. 236.  She had no fear of its spreading farther through his means. There were few people on whose secrecy she would have more confidently depended; but, at the same time, there was no one whose knowledge of a sister’s frailty would have mortified her so much — not, however, from any fear of disadvantage from it individually to herself, for, at any rate, there seemed a gulf impassable between them.

   From such a connexion she could not wonder that he should shrink. The wish of procuring her regard, which she had assured herself of his feeling in Derbyshire, could not in rational expectation survive such a blow as this. She was humbled, she was grieved; she repented, though she hardly knew of what. She became jealous of his esteem, when she could no longer hope to be benefited by it. She wanted to hear of him, when there seemed the least chance of gaining intelligence. She was convinced that she could have been happy with him, when it was no longer likely they should meet.

   What a triumph for him, as she often thought, could he know that the proposals which she had proudly spurned only four months ago, would now have been gladly and gratefully received! He was as generous, she doubted not, as the most generous of his sex; but while he was mortal, there must be a triumph.

   She began now to comprehend that he was exactly the man who, in disposition and talents, would most suit her. His understanding and temper, though unlike her own, would have answered all her wishes. It was an union that must have been to the advantage of both; by her ease and liveliness, his mind might have been softened, his manners improved; and from his judgment, information, and knowledge of the world, she must have received benefit of greater importance.

   But no such happy marriage could now teach the admiring multitude what connubial felicity really was…. [ha!]

p. 243.  Elizabeth’s reaction to discovering that Mr. Darcy was at Lydia and Wickham’s wedding:


Lydia and Wickham – P&P 1995 (Old-Fashioned Charm blog)

But to live in ignorance on such a point was impossible…. Conjectures as to the meaning of it, rapid and wild, hurried into her brain; but she was satisfied with none. Those that best pleased her, as placing his conduct in the noblest light, seemed most improbable. She could not bear such suspense

p. 244. Mrs. Gardiner writes:

“If he had another motive, I am sure it would never disgrace him. [p. 247] Will you be very angry with me, my Dear Lizzy, if I take this opportunity of saying (what I was never bold enough to say before) how much I like him?…. His understanding and opinions all please me; he wants nothing but a little more liveliness, and that, if he marry prudently, his wife may teach him. I thought him very sly; — he hardly ever mentioned your name. But slyness seems the fashion.   “Pray forgive me if I have been very presuming; or at least do not punish me so far as to exclude me from P. …

p. 248. The contents of this letter threw Elizabeth into a flutter of spirits, in which it was difficult to determine whether pleasure or pain bore the greatest share…. Her heart did whisper that he had done it for her. But it was a hope shortly checked by other considerations, and she soon felt that even her vanity was insufficient…


 CE Crock – P&P – Vol. 3, Ch.10 (Mollands)

… They owed the restoration of Lydia, her character, everything to him. Oh! how heartily did she grieve over every ungracious sensation she had ever encouraged, every saucy speech she had ever directed towards him. For herself, she was humbled; but she was proud of him. Proud that in a cause of compassion and honour he had been able to get the better of himself.

p. 254. On Darcy arriving at Longbourn:

… whom she regarded herself with an interest, if not quite so tender, at least as reasonable and just as what Jane felt for Bingley. Her astonishment at his coming — at his coming to Netherfield, to Longbourn, and voluntarily seeking her again, was almost equal to what she had known on first witnessing his altered behaviour in Derbyshire.

The colour, which had been driven from her face, returned for half a minute with an additional glow, and a smile of delight added lustre to her eyes, as she thought for that space of time that his affection and wishes must still be unshaken. But she would not be secure.

p. 255.   Elizabeth back in Teenage-mode…

Let me first see how he behaves,” said she; “it will then be early enough for expectation.”

…  Elizabeth said as little to either as civility would allow, and sat down again to her work, with an eagerness which it did not often command. She had ventured only one glance at Darcy. He looked serious as usual, and, she thought, more as he had been used to look in Hertfordshire, than as she had seen him at Pemberley. But, perhaps, he could not in her mother’s presence be what he was before her uncle and aunt. It was a painful, but not an improbable, conjecture.

…unable to resist the impulse of curiosity, she raised her eyes to his face, she as often found him looking at Jane as at herself, and frequently on no object but the ground. More thoughtfulness, and less anxiety to please than when they last met, were plainly expressed. She was disappointed, and angry with herself for being so.

“Could I expect it to be otherwise!” said she. “Yet why did he come?”

She was in no humour for conversation with any one but himself; and to him she had hardly courage to speak.

And for the next several pages, Elizabeth is described thus – again, perfect teenage behavior!

…dared not lift up her eyes; such misery of shame; misery increased;

“The first wish of my heart,” said she to herself, “is never more to be in company with either of them. Their society can afford no pleasure that will atone for such wretchedness as this! Let me never see either one or the other again!”

p. 258-60. and more of the same…!

As soon as they were gone Elizabeth walked out to recover her spirits; or, in other words, to dwell without interruption on those subjects that must deaden them more. Mr. Darcy’s behaviour astonished and vexed her.

“Why, if he came only to be silent, grave, and indifferent,” said she, “did he come at all?”

She could settle it in no way that gave her pleasure.

“He could be still amiable, still pleasing to my uncle and aunt, when he was in town; and why not to me? If he fears me, why come hither? If he no longer cares for me, why silent? teasing, teasing, man! I will think no more about him.”

 …she was in no cheerful humour. Mr. Darcy was almost as far from her as the table could divide them….

She was in hopes that the evening would afford some opportunity of bringing them together…. Anxious and uneasy,  “If he does not come to me then,” said she, “I shall give him up for ever.”

…Darcy had walked away to another part of the room. She followed him with her eyes, envied every one to whom he spoke, had scarcely patience enough to help anybody to coffee, and then was enraged against herself for being so silly!

“A man who has once been refused! How could I ever be foolish enough to expect a renewal of his love? Is there one among the sex who would not protest against such a weakness as a second proposal to the same woman? There is no indignity so abhorrent to their feelings!”

…They were confined for the evening at different tables, and she had nothing to hope, but that his eyes were so often turned towards her side of the room, as to make him play as unsuccessfully as herself….

playing cards-thefamilyparty-princeton

Isaac Cruikshank (1764-1811), The Family Party or Prince Bladduds Man Traps!!
May 11, 1799 ( blog)


Well, this has been a very long post! – very difficult to edit Austen! – I am stopping here and will pick up with a final post on the eventual happiness of all concerned … What are some of your favorite scenes between Elizabeth and Darcy, or favorite commentary from the Narrator, in Volume 3?

Read Part I of Mr. Darcy’s Feelings here;
and Part II here

c2014, Jane Austen in Vermont

7 thoughts on “Mr. Darcy’s Feelings; Or, More on the Inner Life of Jane Austen’s Hero…Part III

  1. As someone who loves Austen (I took a class last semester and read all of her works in three months, crazy, I know), it’s so nice to read such a well-written Austen post. I love your perspective of this great novel, and you’ve really captured the spirit of Darcy well. I have a literary review blog as well, and I am so inspired to read through Pride & Prejudice again because of this post!


    • Yes, Courtney – a re-read of Pride and Prejudice every year should be required for all – the world would be a better place!

      Thanks for stopping by – I shall follow your blog – I like your idea of reviewing the review!


  2. Love your little asides Deb. They have the pinpoint accuracy of hypodermic needles.

    This one is my favourite.

    “.p. 189-90. Two people completely out of it…”

    I know the feeling after a bottle of wine or two. Very perceptive Deb..


    • Yes, it just was wonderful to re-read these passages very slowly and realize how Austen captures the intensity of their feelings, their internal upheavals – far better than any visual rendition can convey – it makes it clear to me yet again that Austen had to experience this in full force to be able to write about it – we forget how young Lizzie is here and I love this teenage-like behavior in all of volume 3 – he loves me, he loves me not, he loves me, he loves me not…! – who hasn’t gone through this agony!


    • Ha Tony – too true! – I just find it quite amazing how Austen depicts this scene of their discomfort, awkwardness, and Elizabeth’s internal mind-meanderingss – this is all too close to bare reality… one doesn’t need wine to be this out of it!


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